WHAT OILS SHOULD WE USE AND NOT USE WHEN FRYING OUR FOOD?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A little olive oil is one of the healthiest fats to use with salads and stir frying.

Olive oil is high in monounsaturated fatty acids containing only one double-bond. This makes olive oil less likely to oxidise, and is therefore safer and relatively stable when heated.

Avocado oil is also good and has a similar composition to olive oil and has a high smoke point of (270°C) and a slightly nutty taste.

Some fats and oils aren’t suitable for deep frying or high temperature cooking and these include polyunsaturated vegetable oils.

These oils are high in polyunsaturated fatty acids that contain two or more double-bonds in their chemical structure, and when heated at high temperature they can form oxidised fatty acids and harmful toxic compounds.

Oils best not to use in high temperature cooking include.
canola oil
cottonseed oil
safflower
soybean oil
corn oil
rice bran oil
grapeseed oil
sunflower oil
sesame oil
#healthyoils #frying #oliveoil

 

References
Olive Oil Stability Under Deep-Frying Conditions. Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Oct.

HEALTH EFFECTS OF OXIDIZED HEATED OILS Journal of Foodservice 30 June 2006

Lipid peroxidation in culinary oils subjected to thermal stress. Free Radicals and Antioxidants August 2000

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